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Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio: 2018 Classes – Register Now!

New York Internal Arts & Practical Chinese Medicine present

Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio
2018 Seminar Schedule

Hands-on, body-based and action-based seminars in Practical Chinese Medicine, taught by world-renowned practioner, Tom Bisio. Tom combines 40 years experience in the martial arts and Nei Gong practices with over 25 years of clinical experience in traditional Chinese medicine. He has traveled to China numerous times to study internal martial arts, Nei Gong and Chinese medicine. Since 1998 Tom has taught Tui Na, Chinese Sports Medicine and Zang Fu Tui Na to hundreds of students in the United States, Europe and Canada. Tom is a graduate of the Tri-State College of Acupuncture.

The skills taught in Practical Chinese Medicine classes are a distillation of Tom’s apprenticeships, clinical experience and ongoing research into the core principles of traditional Chinese medicine.
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New Classes in Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio: 2016 -2017 Schedule

New York Internal Arts presents

2016-2017  Schedule

New Classes in Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio

We are excited to announce a new concept in teaching traditional Chinese medicine.

For many people, Chinese medicine seems abstract and difficult to comprehend. Yet at its heart, Chinese medicine is simple, direct and practical.

Therefore, Tom Bisio has created Practical Chinese Medicine, offering classes which are hands-on, body-based and action-based, rather than theoretical. In Tom’s classes you understand the principles and methods very quickly, and can use what you learn right away.
Read More…

New Classes in Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio

New York Internal Arts presents

New Classes in Practical Chinese Medicine with Tom Bisio

We are excited to announce a new concept in teaching traditional Chinese medicine.

For many people, Chinese medicine seems abstract and difficult to comprehend. Yet at its heart, Chinese medicine is simple, direct and practical.

Therefore, Tom Bisio has created Practical Chinese Medicine, offering classes which are hands-on, body-based and action-based, rather than theoretical. In Tom’s classes you understand the principles and methods very quickly, and can use what you learn right away.

Tom-Bisio-Zang-Fu-Tui-Na

Our new classes, based on years of Tom’s extensive experience, writings and research, offer students several complimentary ways to immediately penetrate into the heart of what is really going on in Chinese medicine:

1.    Tooth From the Tiger’s Mouth Seminars

Based on Tom’s popular book, A Tooth From the Tiger’s Mouth, in these seminars students directly experience the power and effectiveness of Chinese Medicine in treating and rehabilitating injuries, something Chinese medicine is very good at, often succeeding where Western medicine fails.

2.    Traditional Tui Na

Traditional Tui Na is one of the most powerful modalities in Chinese Medicine, known for consistently producing clinical results. Traditional Tui Na, and its associated Zheng Gu techniques, form a unique, hands-on therapy through which one intuitively perceives and connects with the underlying principles of Chinese medicine.

3.    Zang Fu Tui Na

Zang Fu Tui Na offers a direct, hands-on method of diagnosing organ imbalances, while simultaneously eliciting effective, immediate, and profound changes in the body. It is an important and largely forgotten part of Traditional Tui Na. Working with the internal organs using Zang Fu Tui Na truly matches up with how we feel the Chinese originally conceptualized the functioning and interaction of the internal organs (Zang Fu). A great way to begin to really understand Chinese medicine.

In A Tooth From the Tiger’s Mouth, Tom Bisio introduced Chinese medical concepts in a clear, concise, and learnable manner. Although A Tooth From the Tiger’s Mouth was written for lay people, many Chinese medical practitioners buy the book and it is used in schools of Traditional Oriental Medicine precisely because it has a practical approach that most textbooks lack. This same practical approach is the model for our classes.

In creating these new classes, Tom Bisio combines 40 years experience in the martial arts and Nei Gong practices with over 25 years of clinical experience in traditional Chinese medicine. He has traveled to China numerous times to study internal martial arts, Nei Gong and Chinese medicine. Since 1998 Tom has taught Tui Na, Chinese Sports Medicine and Zang Fu Tui Na to hundreds of students in the United States, Europe and Canada. Tom is a graduate of the Tri-State College of Acupuncture. The skills taught in these classes are a distillation of Tom’s apprenticeships, clinical experience  and ongoing research into the core principles of traditional Chinese medicine.

We invite you to join us.

Join the mailing list and be the first to know about our upcoming 2016-2017 class schedule:

JOIN MAILING LIST HERE

 

21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 4

Image for 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 4

This is Part 4 of a series of articles detailing the 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine, by Tom Bisio.

Virtually everything in the Chinese internal martial arts is congruent with traditional Chinese medicine. All the body principles and alignments are designed to line up the soft tissue, joints and even the organ cavities, so as to maximize free-flowing circulation through the blood vessels and body tissues. Many of the movements common to Tai Ji Quan, Ba Gua Zhang, Xing Yi Quan, Liu He Ba Fa and Tong Bei Quan have the dual purposes of teaching martial techniques with correct body mechanics and simultaneously harmonizing organs and meridians. One of the caveats of this duality is, if you fail to harmonize the organs and meridians, the martial techniques don’t quite mesh properly.

Read Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 of this article. by clicking on the links. Read More…

21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 3

Image for 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 3

This is Part 3 of a series of articles detailing the 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine, by Tom Bisio.

Virtually everything in the Chinese internal martial arts is congruent with traditional Chinese medicine. All the body principles and alignments are designed to line up the soft tissue, joints and even the organ cavities, so as to maximize free-flowing circulation through the blood vessels and body tissues. Many of the movements common to Tai Ji Quan, Ba Gua Zhang, Xing Yi Quan, Liu He Ba Fa and Tong Bei Quan have the dual purposes of teaching martial techniques with correct body mechanics and simultaneously harmonizing organs and meridians. One of the caveats of this duality is, if you fail to harmonize the organs and meridians, the martial techniques don’t quite mesh properly.

Read Part 1 and Part 2 of this article by clicking on the links. Read More…

Man Dan Yang Acupuncture: The 12 Miraculous Points – Part 12

Image for Man Dan Yang Acupuncture: The 12 Miraculous Points – Part 12

Man Dan Yang was a practitioner of Daoism in the 12th century. As a young man he developed great skill in acupuncture and moxibustion (Zhen Jiu 针灸). He left behind an ode to 12 miraculous acu-points, today known as Man Dan Yang Acupuncture. If you want to learn a few acupuncture points that produce consistent results in treating a variety of illnesses, learn these!

This article presents Man Dan-Yang’s ode to the tenth acu-point, Lie Que (LU 7).

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21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 2

Image for 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine – Part 2

This is Part 2 of a series of articles detailing the 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine, by Tom Bisio.

More than one senior master in Beijing has told me: “if you want to understand the Nei Jia, you have to know Chinese medicine.” This does not mean you have to be a doctor of traditional Chinese medicine, but it does mean you need to know a few basic Chinese medical facts and principles. Virtually everything in the Chinese internal martial arts is congruent with traditional Chinese medicine. Many of the movements common to the internal martial arts have the dual purposes of teaching martial techniques with correct body mechanics and simultaneously harmonizing organs and meridians.

Read Part One of this article HERE.

Read More…

21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know About Chinese Medicine – Part 1

Image for 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know About Chinese Medicine – Part 1

This is Part 1 of a series of articles detailing the 21 Things Every Internal Martial Artist Should Know about Chinese Medicine, by Tom Bisio.

Virtually everything in the Chinese internal martial arts is congruent with traditional Chinese medicine. All the body principles and alignments are designed to line up the soft tissue, joints and even the organ cavities, so as to maximize free-flowing circulation through the blood vessels and body tissues. Many of the movements common to Tai Ji Quan, Ba Gua Zhang, Xing Yi Quan, Liu He Ba Fa and Tong Bei Quan have the dual purposes of teaching martial techniques with correct body mechanics and simultaneously harmonizing organs and meridians. One of the caveats of this duality is, if you fail to harmonize the organs and meridians, the martial techniques don’t quite mesh properly. Read More…

Man Dan Yang Acupuncture: The 12 Miraculous Points – Part 11

Image for Man Dan Yang Acupuncture: The 12 Miraculous Points – Part 11

Man Dan Yang was a practitioner of Daoism in the 12th century. As a young man he developed great skill in acupuncture and moxibustion (Zhen Jiu 针灸). He left behind an ode to 12 miraculous acu-points, today known as Man Dan Yang Acupuncture. If you want to learn a few acupuncture points that produce consistent results in treating a variety of illnesses, learn these!

This article presents Man Dan-Yang’s ode to the tenth acu-point, Tong Li (HT 5)

Read More…

20 Acupuncture Points Every Martial Artist Should Know: Part 2

Image for 20 Acupuncture Points Every Martial Artist Should Know: Part 2

A basic knowledge of acupuncture points (acu-points) is an invaluable tool for the martial artist. If you are interested in learning about acupuncture points start with the 20 Acu-points every practitioner of the internal martial arts should know. If you practice Qi Gong, Nei Gong or Daoist Meditation, you should know these points too…

This is Part Two of a 2-part article. Read Part One here.

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