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Posts tagged: Five Animal Play

Stepping Patterns, Rhythms & Internal Movement in the Internal Arts and Five Animal Play Exercises: Part 1

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Walking, along with breathing, sitting and standing, is one our most primal movements. Very early on in China there was a recognition that these primal movements could have profound effects on human consciousness and physical functioning. Indications of this awareness appear in some of the oldest known medical documents unearthed from the Zhangjiashan (Hubei province) and Mawangdui (Hunan province) tombs. Read More…

Jiao Guo Rui’s 15 Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play: Part 2

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This post is the second part Jiao Guo Rui’s 15 Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play of excerpted from the book, Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux (Five Animal Play) by Jiao Guo Rui, De Ye Tao and Hu Yao Zhen, translated by Grégory Mardaga. The book presents three different versions of the Five Animal Play exercises.

Jiao Guo Rui was a student of Hu Yao Zhen. The text below forms Jiao Guo Rui’s introduction to the Five Animal Play. However, it is essentially a discussion of important points relating to Nei Gong in general. Although some of these points are mentioned in Jiao’s book Qi Gong Essentials for Health Promotion, the discussion is more detailed in Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux.

Translation from the French by Tom Bisio

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Jiao Guo Rui’s 15 Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play: Part 1

Image for Jiao Guo Rui’s 15 Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play: Part 1

This post is excerpted from the book, Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux (Five Animal Play) by Jiao Guo Rui, De Ye Tao and Hu Yao Zhen, translated by Grégory Mardaga. The book presents three different versions of the Five Animal Play exercises.

Jiao Guo Rui was a student of Hu Yao Zhen. The text below forms Jiao Guo Rui’s introduction to the Five Animal Play. However, it is essentially a discussion of important points relating to Nei Gong in general. Although some of these points are mentioned in Jiao’s book Qi Gong Essentials for Health Promotion, the discussion is more detailed in Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux.

Translation from the French by Tom Bisio.

Read More…

Hu Yao Zhen Important Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play (Wu Qin Shu): Part 2

Image for Hu Yao Zhen Important Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play (Wu Qin Shu): Part 2

This post is excerpted from the book, Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux (Five Animal Play) by Jiao Guo Rui, De Ye Tao and Hu Yao Zhen, translated by Grégory Mardaga. The book presents three different versions of the Five Animal Play exercises.

The text below forms Hu Yao Zhen’s introduction to the Five Animal Play. However, it is essentially a discussion of important points relating to Nei Gong in general, particularly exercises involving standing like Zhan Zhuang and holding San Ti Shi. The text has many parallels with my own discussions with my Xing Yi school brother, Master Song Zhi Yong, regarding spontaneous movement as it appears in the Xing Yi Quan practices of Tu Na Si Ba and San Ti Shi. I think it will be of interest to practitioners of both Nei Gong and Xing Yi.

Translation from the French by Tom Bisio.

Read Part 1 of this article HERE.
Read More…

Hu Yao Zhen Important Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play (Wu Qin Shu): Part I

Image for Hu Yao Zhen Important Points on Nei Gong and Five Animal Play (Wu Qin Shu): Part I

This post is excerpted from the book, Les Jeu Des Cinq Animaux (Five Animal Play) by Jiao Guo Rui, De Ye Tao and Hu Yao Zhen, translated by Grégory Mardaga. The book presents three different versions of the Five Animal Play exercises.

The text below forms Hu Yao Zhen’s introduction to the Five Animal Play. However, it is essentially a discussion of important points relating to Nei Gong in general, particularly exercises involving standing like Zhan Zhuang and holding San Ti Shi. The text has many parallels with my own discussions with my Xing Yi school brother, Master Song Zhi Yong, regarding spontaneous movement as it appears in the Xing Yi Quan practices of Tu Na Si Ba and San Ti Shi. I think it will be of interest to practitioners of both Nei Gong and Xing Yi.

Translation from the French by Tom Bisio. Read More…

Stepping Patterns, Rhythms and Internal Movement in The Internal Arts and Five Animal Play Exercises: Part 2

Image for Stepping Patterns, Rhythms and Internal Movement in The Internal Arts and Five Animal Play Exercises: Part 2

Part 2 of an essay on how stepping patterns and rhythms create different Internal movements. Specific walking methods can activate different organ and meridian systems and modulate the movement of the qi in specific ways that are congruent with the principles of Chinese medicine. Read More…

Stepping Patterns, Rhythms & Internal Movement in the Internal Arts and Five Animal Play Exercises: Part 1

Image for Stepping Patterns, Rhythms & Internal Movement in the Internal Arts and Five Animal Play Exercises: Part 1

Walking, along with breathing, sitting and standing, is one our most primal movements. Very early on in China there was a recognition that these primal movements could have profound effects on human consciousness and physical functioning. Indications of this awareness appear in some of the oldest known medical documents unearthed from the Zhangjiashan (Hubei province) and Mawangdui (Hunan province) tombs. Read More…

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