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The Eight Ba Gua Rolling Hands Exercises: Part 1

Ba Gua Rolling Hands exercises are akin to Tai Ji Quan’s Pushing Hands. The first of the Liang Style Ba Gua Eight Rolling Hands Exercises is the Hip Sucking Palm.

Excerpted from Compendium of Ba Gua Zhang Art by Guo Gu Min, edited by Zang Xue Fan. Jilin Science and Technology Publishers. 

1. Hip-Sucking Palm

Hip-Sucking-Palm-1

Preparation: A (White Pants) and B (Grey Pants) stand face to face, with two feet closed and two palms dropping down naturally along the side of the body, looking at each other. (Fig. 1)

Main Points: Drop the shoulders, sink the yao and relax the whole body.

Movement 1: Both A and B walk forward with the right foot. Simultaneously, extend the right palm and touch each other with the lateral side of the wrist, flex the left arm to protect the chest with the left palm. (Fig. 2)

Main Points: Drop the shoulders and elbows, relax the whole body and shift the weight on the posterior leg.

Movement 2: A flexes the right arm and rotates the right palm inward, holding a position against the lateral side of the right wrist of B’s arm, rotating outward and pushing forward with a straight arm and flexed leg. B starts to flex the right arm and retreat. (Fig. 3)

Main Points: There must be coordination between the movements of the palm and leg.

Hip-Sucking-Palm-2

Movement 3: A bends the knee of the right leg and shifts the weight forward, pushing B with the right palm as the arm extends, and rotates outward by borrowing B’s power to turn the palm leftward. With bursting power on the lateral side of the wrist of the right palm, B greets A’s attacking palm. Simultaneously, he moves the low back with the hip and turn the knee backward and shifts the weight backward. Both A and B do not move the left palm. (Fig. 4)

Main Points: When B takes in the hip and turns the low back and knee to dissolve A’s attacking force, it depends upon A’s pushing and rotating force.

Movement 4: After being pushed backward to the limit, B flexes the knee and shifts the weight forward, rotating the right palm inward and then pushing the lateral side of the wrist of A’s outward-rotating arm with the palm. He then rotates the arm outward to the extremity with the palm turning leftward. A flexes the arm and rotates the right arm outward and dissolves B’s attacking palm with Peng [1] on the lateral side of the wrist. At the same time, move the low back and knee with the hip and turn backward and shift the weight backward. Both A and B do not move in the left palms. (Fig. 5)

Main Points: When A takes in the hip to move the low back and knee for dissolving B’s attacking force, it depends upon B’s pushing and rotating force.

Movement 5: Both A and B practice with the left and right forms in alternation and then push each other to change sides. When A pushes B, he steps forward with the right foot to the lateral side of B’s right foot. (Fig. 6)

Main Points: Step forward while A pushes B, and the movements should be coordinated.

Movement 6: B steps backward with the right foot. A walks forward with the left foot to the medial side of B’s left foot. At the same time, the left palm of both A and B pierces forward underneath the right elbow to touch the lateral side of the wrist. (Fig. 7)

Main Points: When both A and B step forward and walk backward touching each others’ wrists, the movements should be in coordination and the force should be unified, without stiff force or resistance.

Hip-Sucking-Palm-3

Hip-Sucking-Palm-4

Movement 7: A flexes the left leg, shifts the weight forward and rotates the left palm with the straight arm to push B, and then turn the arm outward with the palm facing the right. B flexes the arm and rotates the left palm and uses a bursting force on the lateral side of the wrist to take A’s attacking palm. At the same time, turn the low back and knee backward with the hip and shift the weight backward. Both A and B do not move in the right palms. (Fig. 8)

Main Points: When B takes in the hip and turns the low back and knee to dissolve A’s attacking force, it depends upon A’s pushing and rotating force.

Movement 8: While pushed backward to the limit, B rotates the left palm and arm inward to push the lateral side of the wrist of A’s outward-rotating arm with the palm, and at the same time, flexes the knee and shifts the weight forward. A flexes the arm and rotates the left palm and uses a bursting force on the lateral side of the wrist to take B’s attacking palm. At the same time, turn the low back and knee backward with the hip and shift the weight backward. Both A and B do not move in the right palms. (Fig. 9)

Main Points: When A takes in the hip and turns the low back and knee to dissolve B’s attacking force, it depends upon B’s pushing and rotating force.

Movement 9: Both A and B practice with the left and right forms in alternation and push each other to change sides. When B pushes A, steps forward with the left foot to the lateral side of A’s left foot. (Fig. 10)

Hip-Sucking-Palm-5

Main Points: Step forward while B pushes A, and the movements should be in coordination.

Movement 10: A steps backward with the left foot. B walks forward with the right foot to the medial side of A’s right foot. At the same time, the right palm of both A and B pierces forward underneath the left elbow to touch the lateral side of the wrist. (Fig. 11)

Main Points: When both A and B step forward and walk backward touching each others’ wrists, the movements should be in coordination and the force should be unified, without stiff force or resistance.

Movement 11: Finish the Form: Both A and B practice in the left and right forms in alternation, push repeatedly until they finish the form. Both A and B walk backward with the right foot to close with the left foot, with two palm dropping downward naturally along the side of the body. (Fig. 12)

Main Points: Drop the shoulders, sink the low back, relax the whole body and maintain a smooth respiration.

 

Hip-Sucking-Palm-6

[1] 棚 Peng (Beng): Translated as “arrow quiver.” This character is usually Romanized as Peng. It is an obscure word that may connote an opening up or a moment of releasing, like  pulling a cork from a bottle. It may also have something to do with the sounds these actions involve. Here Peng is followed by the character for “transformation” (Hua). The oppoents’ attack is transformed or dissolved using Peng Jin.

 

 

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