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Sun Xi Kun on Daoism Part 6: Women’s Aperture Closing Gong – Practice Method for Women

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Following Part 1 (Authentic Cultivation of Daoism), Part 2 (True Formula of the Dao Elixir Secret Treasure), Part 3 (The Method of Quiet Sitting), Part 4 (General Discussion of the Medicine-Collecting Method) and Part 5 (Sun Xi Kun on Daoism Part V: Woman’s Seated Meditation Method for Cultivating the Daowe continue with Sun Xi Kun on Daoism with the General Discussion of the Medicine Collecting Method

These articles on Daoism are excerpted from The True Transmission of Ba Gua Zhang (八卦拳真传 Ba Gua Zhang Zhen Chuan), by Sun Xi Kun 孙锡 堃

In front of the two eyebrows and behind Feng Fu (acu-point DU 16), on the left and right, 0.3 cun above the tips of the  two ears, in the center (with the hands crossed), there is a “Qi sack” (Qi Bao) that links with the Yan Sui Guan (“long marrow tube”). [1] This is called Yu Ding (Jade Tripod). [2] There is an acu-point 1.3 cun below and behind the navel, in front of the kidneys (in front 70% and behind 30%) and above the two hips, that is suspended in the center of the body.
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Regulatory Tui Na Treatment for Children Under Age Six

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Pediatric medicine in China follows a few basic principles, based on children’s constitutions.

  • The digestion is weak so it is easy for food to become stagnant. Improper diet can easily affect their health.
  • Because children are very yang they get fevers easily and their spirit is not stable – it is easily disturbed.
  • They are susceptible to disease which can transform rapidly.
  • They can recover quickly from disease because their visceral Qi is clear relative to the visceral Qi of adults.
  • Their Essence and Qi are not yet developed so they do not have reserves of Jing (Essence) to draw on – so they easily become hungry and full and can easily have their spleen and digestion damaged.

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The Eight Daoist Immortals and The Eight Trigrams: Part 4

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The Daoist Eight Immortals are engaging archetypal characters who embody the Eight Trigrams of the Yi Jing, and different aspects of human consciousness and personality. Their stories and their character traits illustrate much about Daoism and our own nature. This is the fourth and final installment of a series of four articles on the Eight Daoist Immortals.

Read Part One HERE. Read More…

Sun Xi Kun on Daoism Part V: Woman’s Seated Meditation Method for Cultivating the Dao

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Following Part 1 (Authentic Cultivation of Daoism), Part 2 (True Formula of the Dao Elixir Secret Treasure), Part 3 (The Method of Quiet Sitting) and Part 4 (General Discussion of the Medicine-Collecting Methodwe continue with Sun Xi Kun on Daoism with the General Discussion of the Medicine Collecting Method.  These articles on Daoism are excerpted from The True Transmission of Ba Gua Zhang (八卦拳真传 Ba Gua Zhang Zhen Chuan), by Sun Xi Kun 孙锡 堃

In Kun Gong [1] seated meditation, shut the mouth and hide the tongue, with the tongue touching (propping up) the palate. On the palate, their are two holes. They are called Tian Chi (Mountain Lake) acu-points, which go up to link directly with the brain. Above the brain is the Bai Hui acu-point (DU 20), which is exactly at the top of the head (vertex). This is the “upper leakage”. If the qi leaks upward, it is not possible to extend life.
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Tendon Soup Helps Heal Ligament and Tendon Injuries

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Tendon soup is a common-sense healing recipe that many of us have forgotten about with the rise of modern medicine. Eating tendon soup or tendon broth several times a week can help ligament and tendon injuries heal faster. If you are engaged in activities that stress the tendons and ligaments – such as martial arts, dance and/or intensive sports – tendon soup can also be eaten once a week to help prevent injury.

Tendon soup is a traditional Asian dish that can be found at Vietnamese and Chinese restaurants, especially in cities where there is a large Asian population.

Below are two recipes for making tendon soup yourself. Read More…

The Eight Daoist Immortals and The Eight Trigrams: Part 3

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The Daoist Eight Immortals are engaging archetypal characters who embody the Eight Trigrams of the Yi Jing, and different aspects of human consciousness and personality. Their stories and their character traits illustrate much about Daoism and our own nature. This is the third of a series of four articles on the Eight Daoist Immortals.

Read Part One HERE. Read More…

The Eight Daoist Immortals and The Eight Trigrams: Part 2

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The Eight Daoist Immortals are engaging archetypal characters who embody the Eight Trigrams of the Yi Jing, and different aspects of human consciousness and personality. Their stories and their character traits illustrate much about Daoism and our own nature. This is the second of a series of four articles on the Eight Daoist Immortals. Read Part One HERE. Read More…

Sun Xi Kun on Daoism Part IV: General Discussion of the Medicine-Collecting Method

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Following Part 1 (Authentic Cultivation of Daoism), Part 2 (True Formula of the Dao Elixir Secret Treasure), and Part 3 (The Method of Quiet Sitting), we continue with Sun Xi Kun on Daoism with the General Discussion of the Medicine Collecting Method.  These articles on Daoism are excerpted from The True Transmission of Ba Gua Zhang 八卦拳真传 Ba Gua Zhang Zhen Chuan by Sun Xi Kun 孙锡 堃

“Medicine” means Pre Heaven One Qi. What is Pre-Heaven One Qi? Before Heaven and Earth, there was no Heaven and Earth; this qi appeared naturally in the Hun Dun (primordial undifferentiated state). The root of yin is the root of Wu Ji (no-limit) and then Tai Ji  (great limit). Then Tai Ji, gave birth to yin and yang.  This qi spreads and moves (prevails), giving birth to human beings and all living things. Read More…

My Apprenticeship with Li Gui Chang by Mao Ming Chun

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Originally posted online in Chinese, this is an English translation of an essay by Mao Ming Chun, one the disciples of Xing Yi Master Li Gui Chang. In this excerpt, Mao talks about his apprenticeship with Master Li, training in Xing Yi Quan, the importance of San Ti Shi and the nature of internal training. A rare treat! Read More…

The Eight Daoist Immortals and The Eight Trigrams: Part 1

Image for The Eight Daoist Immortals and The Eight Trigrams: Part 1

The Eight Daoist Immortals are engaging archetypal characters who embody the Eight Trigrams of the Yi Jing, and different aspects of human consciousness and personality. Their stories and their character traits illustrate much about Daoism and our own nature. This is the first of a series of four articles on the Eight Daoist Immortals. Read More…

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